Episodes invariably ended with Hercules racing towards Mount Olympus and shouting "Olympia!"

When in serious danger, he puts on a magic ring which gives him superpowers. The most noticeably different voice was that of Newton: his original voice sounds as if he has just hit puberty, with his voice constantly cracking, while the later episodes give him a high-pitched Mickey Mouse-like voice. The episodes "The Minotaur" and "The Chair of Forgetfulness" provide good examples of the first set of voices and the first version of the ring sequence, while the episodes "The Nemean Lion" and "The Chameleon Creature" are good examples of the second set of voices and later ring sequence.

four of the films were originally Maciste movies in Italy, and the others were just isolated gladiator or mythological hero movies not released theatrically in the US.

The show generally used real Greek myths as the inspiration for its episodes, but used the influences oddly. Villains threaten the people of ancient Greece, often in the kingdom of Calydon, and Hercules comes to the rescue. Hercules, Newton, and the Evil Magician, This page was last edited on 8 September 2020, at 03:30. [citation needed] The transformative "ring anthem" frequently used as Hercules slips on his magic ring, along with several bridges of music used throughout the episodes, were taken from the 1954 film The Black Shield of Falworth, with the music credited to Joseph Gershenson but actually composed by Hans J. Salter, Herman Stein, and Frank Skinner, the longtime in-house film composer for Universal Studios. The first title listed for each film was its American television title, followed by the translated original Italian title in parentheses: In addition to the ring, later episodes added new equipment for Hercules and his friends to use, such as a "moonstone beam" in his belt and an invulnerable sword and shield. [citation needed], In 1963, Golden Records released a tie-in long-playing record for children entitled The Mighty Hercules (LP-108), with words and music by Winston Sharples. [2][3], The cartoon features Hercules, the legendary hero, who dwells on Mount Olympus. Also featured atop Mount Olympus are Hercules's father Zeus and Dodonis with his crystal rock of seeing. after defeating the villain. None of the other familiar characters make an appearance in the episode, and it features different character designs for Hercules and Helena.

Other recurring creatures – such as the Nemean lion, the Lernaean Hydra, the Erymanthian Boar, and the Stymphalian birds — were taken directly from the Twelve Labors of Hercules but, unlike in the Twelve Labors, most of the creatures are not presented in the cartoon as trials for Hercules to overcome. Most of the early episodes have the first set of voices, and the rest have the second set, and in the seventh episode during the first season, "Double Trouble," the voices actually change during the episode, with Newton near the end of the episode speaking a line in his original cracking voice and in his very next line switching to his second, high-pitched voice, while Hercules speaks in his first voice until his final two lines of the episode, which are in Hercules's second voice.

The Mighty Hercules is a Canadian/American animated television series based loosely on the Greek mythology character of Heracles, under his Roman name Hercules.

The rest of the episode involves Hercules meeting Helena and fighting a giant named Cacus and the giant's pet dragon. The theme music is credited to Winston Sharples (as "Win Sharples"), who in more than two decades at Paramount Pictures had composed background music for the Superman (1941) and Popeye theatrical cartoons produced by Fleischer Studios, while the theme's lyrics were written by Sharples's son Winston Sharples, Jr., under th…

Although two of them did originally feature Hercules (and not his sons), The Mighty Hercules features a theme song sung by Johnny Nash, the American reggae singer-songwriter best known for 1956's "A Very Special Love" and 1972's "I Can See Clearly Now".

[6][7] The theme music is credited to Winston Sharples (as "Win Sharples"), who in more than two decades at Paramount Pictures had composed background music for the Superman (1941) and Popeye theatrical cartoons produced by Fleischer Studios, while the theme's lyrics were written by Sharples's son Winston Sharples, Jr., under the pseudonym "Win Singleton" (his first and middle names).

All 20 episodes are from season 1, the last one being episode 40.



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